Clarkisha Kent, Author Of Fat Off, Fat On: A Big Bitch Manifesto

“Clarkisha Kent: Expect to laugh, do a little crying, like I said, very, very triggering material. You’re gonna have your own biases challenges too.”

Check out our chat with @IWriteAllDay_ about her debut book Fat Off, Fat On: A Big Bitch Manifesto!

The internet’s favourite wordsmith and coiner of the phrase ‘Groupon Peen’ Clarkisha Kent honoured us by allowing us to have the first interview as a part of the preorder campaign for Fat Off, Fat On: A Big Bitch Manifesto, preorder your copy here and check out our conversation below!

Cover of Fat Off, Fat On by Clarkisha Kent
Cover of Fat Off, Fat On by Clarkisha Kent
Cover photo by Monica Escamilla

Keshav Kant
Let’s hop right in! So you’ve been a writer forever. You’ve written for basically every major platform, and your words are in everything. But Fat Off, Fat On your debut book, is almost here. So I have to ask, How are you feeling about everything that’s happening now that the cover is out and that preorders are rolling?

Clarkisha Kent
I am both very excited, but also very nervous. Unlike some of these articles that you mentioned, and these other publications, this is a much more in-depth look at myself and my life. So there’s gonna be things that you know, I’ve never shared with the general public, right. But also some of my current friends and associates don’t even know this stuff about me because, as much as I do share, I’m also very private. I don’t think- there’s that meme that floats around. I don’t know who started but I would love to, whoever did it, you’re great because it sums up my whole thing. Right? We should all know less about each other. I think the more- I don’t want to be like the old person, you know, talking about “Get off my lawn” in terms of social media. But you know, it, it has put us in a place where like people want to hyper fixate on certain details about you, celebrity-celebrity or not. So I think a little mystique is good. So that’s why I tend to keep some- some things under wraps. So it’s gonna be interesting to see how some of these extra new details kind of play out in the public eye, so to speak.

Headshot of Clarkisha Kent author of Fat Off, Fat On taken by Cheyenne Ewulu
Headshot of Clarkisha Kent
Photo by Cheyenne Ewulu

Keshav Kant
Honestly, like, there’s this TikTok audio that was talking about it. It’s like, are you really- are you really letting people in or are you just giving them factoids about yourself? And I was like, oh!

Clarkisha Kent
Exactly.

Keshav Kant
Like, I’m not letting y’all in. I’ll let you know what’s up and let you know about the things I don’t care about. But I’m not letting you in.

Clarkisha Kent
Yeah.

Keshav Kant
And that’s actually one of the things at the very beginning of Fat Off Fat On, that you explicitly say you’re like a reader. If this were any other circumstance, I’d tell you to get the fuck out of my business.

Clarkisha Kent
Yup.

Keshav Kant
But I can’t, because I invited you here. So what was that process like for you, as someone who’s a little bit more private, of like, sharing very intimate details, very personal details from your life? And what have you been doing to protect your mental health and protect your peace as we go into the book being publicly available?

Clarkisha Kent
It was definitely very raw, because there’s a lot of subject matter, and that’s very triggering. So, anyone who’s about to read it, like, basically trigger warning for everything, I’m so serious, for everything. Everything you can think of just trigger warning, before you open the book, you know, because my intent obviously is not to harm or like, you know, rattle you even before you get to the good stuff, right. But it’s very raw, had to dig very deep, there were some deep cut memories that I really had to like, you know, I gotta, I haven’t thought about this for a while. So now I gotta dig. I also thankfully, you know, as fate would have it, I had, I was in a place financially, despite kind of the ups and downs of my life last two years, for people who remember the house fire, right? I had to have a psychiatrist and psychologist on deck. So basically, I would write obviously, probably a traumatizing chapter. And then like, immediately in like the following session, whether it was the same week or next week, I’d be like, hey, so I uncovered this deep cut memory while writing this chapter. Let’s talk about it. So there’s that. And then besides that, you know, the last couple of years, I’ve gotten increasingly more spiritual, too. So that has helped a lot in terms of ways I keep, you know, some of my life still very private, you know what I mean.

Keshav Kant
Definitely! We don’t talk enough about this the way creativity and your craft can impact your mental health. Especially in the system we live in right now. Because being a creative, it is essentially being okay with this predatory bullshit. That is kind of how I have to survive. But especially when it comes to memoirs, when it comes to personal stories, personal essays, and personal poems, it gets even more tenuous. So it’s very good to hear that you had the resources to get the help that you needed. And you have actively had this like support system of medical professionals and spirituality, especially the spirituality because a good amount of your book, you talk about your relationship with the faith you were raised with, and like being in the church in the impact that like, what’s the best way to phrase this?

Clarkisha Kent
Organized religion?

Keshav Kant
Organized religion, yes, but it’s wonderful to hear that you were still able to like come back and reconnect to spirituality in a way that works for you. Now, one of the things that you were pretty explicit about is your experiences with fatphobia, weight loss and gain. As well as the impact of, you know, growing up in the late 90s, early 2000s, with all the like, this person’s on a crash diet, look at them, they ballooned to a size four. It was a lot of these really harmful messages. Then for a brief moment, it went stealth and we got the body positivity movement. Now we’re coming back to just boldface fatphobia and as a fat person myself, it’s really frustrating. So can we just talk about like, the grip fatphobia has on everyone? We got Laurie Harvey talking about she went on a crash diet for the Met Gala. We got Kim Kardashian talking about she basically like, did everything humanly possible to fit into this Marilyn gown like, why is it necessary?

Clarkisha Kent
I don’t remember-I am bad lately with quotes but it’s just progress in modern society is so fickle because you’ll swing it one way. Someone somewhere else in the oppressor class will feel a way and it’ll rapidly and violently swing back the other way. I think outside of like standard fatphobia if you look at historical trends, this kind of tracks right, whenever. For example, I think when we had like, the height of flapper culture, I believe we were going through a fucking Depression, you know? It’s like, similar to COVID now, right, I talked about it early on, in the pandemic, lots of people don’t listen or care. But, you know, there was a lot of messaging while people were stuck at home, eating more, and, you know, half probably were like, maybe they thought away about it, but half actually were like, Hey, this is my biggest weight, but I feel really good. You know, I call it you know, Big Diet, you know, that industry hey don’t like that. The diet industry, size industry, whatever, the whole health, you know, mega-complex, they don’t like that. So a lot of messaging I noticed a lot of it got ramped up weight loss, health. I think we talked about yesterday, gut health, and probiotics, which the latter is very known.

Keshav Kant
Everyone and their mama became a fucking just like dieticians over the past few years. I’m like, where are- where are these degrees? From the University of Arizona online?

Clarkisha Kent
Right. Like, probiotics are very good, for example, for vagina health, right? But if you’re talking about weight loss, I’m like, okay? Anyways, a lot of it has to do with some COVID messaging. You know, I personally blame the CDC. Who have for their entire history of existence been very fatphobic, zo they also certainly didn’t help.

But very early on, I got an ad for a Chris Hemsworth app. Talking about like weight loss, sin, and exercise and all that bullshit. And it just kind of ramped up from there. I also saw increased ads from Noom, that hell app, the hell company. You know, they like to make their weight loss gadget app very pretty, very colourful, it’s colour-coded. So for people who like stuff like that, they’re gonna automatically be drawn to all those nice colours and gadgets and stuff. But it’s the same old shit repackaged over and over and over and over and over again. So that’s my thing. I feel like people end up playing what the real COVID played, and kind of really aggressively bringing back more overt fatphobia so they’re irritating because our bodies are very concerned with keeping us alive. But you’re mad at it because it gained 15 pounds because you were happy, or because it gained 15 pounds. Because I mean, I guess yeah, you weren’t sitting and rotting away in the office. But let me not get too into that.

Keshav Kant
Honestly, I think I think it’s it’s rooted in that same bullshit misconception of fat is unhealthy. And because we’re in plague times, you can’t be unhealthy.

Clarkisha Kent
No.

Keshav Kant
I was like I, at my fattest, am most probably healthier than you are.

Clarkisha Kent
Yes.

Keshav Kant
Because I have to be.

Clarkisha Kent
Yeah.

Keshav Kant
Because if there’s anything wrong with me at all, no one’s going to take it seriously.

Clarkisha Kent
Nope, not at all.

Keshav Kant
And I think part of that is like, a lot of people are finally getting a chance to rest. Their bodies aren’t in that fight or flight. so their bodies are calming down. They’re not stressed out, and they’re actually able to process their nutrition. People were being very diligent about eating better. Being very careful with what they ingest, and not going out too much. I think all of that combined jas their bodies being like, ‘oh, I can actually rest and take in nutrients? I can be the weight I should be instead of like, just operating on like fight or flight?’ and I don’t think that connection’s clicked for people.

Clarkisha Kent
But also Westerners are very vapid, I had a very interesting conversation with my sister. She was like, I wonder how the response to COVID would have been if it was like COVID caused a very visceral and their visual, like, physical reaction? So let’s say you caught COVID and suddenly, your face broke out in hives. You got the chickenpox, something like, I don’t know, half of your face was covered in X amount and the other half wasn’t. Like if there’s something physical, and I’m sorry to say something that would make you maybe look ugly, right? I think the reaction the response to it would have been much, much different. The mobilization against it would have been much, much quicker. But also, I’m also suspicious about that, too, because maybe makeup companies would have capitalized on it. Makeup companies have taken a hit because no one wants to beat their faces anymore because there’s no incentive to really unless you’re going out. So who knows? Maybe some other great capitalist evil would have filled that gap. But I definitely still wonder what would have happened if like I said, COVID gives your so-called beauty, right, a really major hit, right.

Keshav Kant
I think that like we’re in a place in like late-stage capitalism, not even late stage, we are in the trenches in this bitch. With capitalism, where like, anything that happens will be commodified.

Clarkisha Kent
Yes.

Keshav Kant
Anything. So like we saw that happened with the body positivity movement, it was hijacked by skinny people, because main character syndrome, and then companies came in being like, you can be fat, just not like-

Clarkisha Kent
Like that.

Keshav Kant
Not like that. And then also buy our leggings. And then we got diet culture coming in again, with like, do you remember chlorophyll water last year, it was everywhere? So it’s, it’s ridiculous. But I do think like, specifically in the context of pretty privileged when it comes to like marginalization. I think part of that, again, is like, would COVID if there had been a physical reaction, people would have taken it seriously for a bit. And then eventually, they would have been like, okay, but it’s, I don’t need to worry about it as long as I don’t have it.

Clarkisha Kent
Exactly.

Keshav Kant
It’s them, they’re the ugly ones.

Clarkisha Kent
Yes, exactly.

Keshav Kant
And I think with fatness and outside of just fatness because you do discuss being fat, in the colorism, and like disability in general in the book, I think it’s, it all compounds into a version of like they- that person doesn’t take care of themselves.

Clarkisha Kent
Yeah.

Keshav Kant
So why should I care about that? And it’s very rooted in like, dehumanization.

Clarkisha Kent
And individualism right?

Keshav Kant
Right! And speaking of all of the ways those compounding identities sort of basically deny a person your their personhood. That’s something you discussed in Fat Off Fat On, when you did loses a significant amount of weight while you were still fat, people treated you differently because you weren’t as fat. I think that hierarchy and what’s acceptable play such a huge role. Which people don’t like to talk about it.

Clarkisha Kent
Yeah, I just it-it really comes down to unfortunately what cishet men find very attractive.

We always have to acknowledge that their desirability politics be beating all our asses, um, queer or not. People don’t like to say but queer or not, them desirability politics really be just in a chokehold. It’s like, if your tits are the right size, your waist is cinched in a little, hips look a little good you know, people might take a little bit easier on you. I know for a while and, I think greater still people still talk about the shapes, right? You got basically the coke bottle, you got the pear, you got the apple. A lot of people’s preferences for the little coke bottle, right? You can get away with the pear shape if once again, that waist is you know, cinched a little bit. Um, people don’t like to talk about apples because apple shapes you know, will give you like, usually right, a larger stomach. But my whole thing is like if you’re fat period. Usually, you’re going to have this, you can’t have the big tits and big ass without the stomach like that’s what is a package deal is a package. People don’t like to talk about that, but it is a package deal usually.

Now particularly with things like say Rihanna’s pregnancy, because she got away with putting on the crop tops, see-through outfits, etc. things and objects that people will crucify or regular fat people for wearing. So I feel like, a lot of that is the fact that you know, oh, she’s pregnant right now. Eventually, she’ll go back to being, you know, right and tight. So watching people’s reactions to her pregnancy, versus like, what fat people are usually allowed to wear has been very interesting, too. But yeah, but my point on the whole, the reference, in general, is that like, if you are the right type of fat, according to the things that I mentioned, not to say that you’ll have the easiest time. But the fatphobia oftentimes won’t be as violent. It’ll take some of the edges off. So yeah, really fucked up, but.

Keshav Kant
I think it’s also part- part of that is also root-rooted in like the fetishism of fatness because acceptable fat is again, it’s, it has to be in places that are sexualized. It has to be, your ass, your hips, tits, it has to be in places that are geared towards cishet male consumption.

Clarkisha Kent
Yes.

Keshav Kant
And their pleasure.

Clarkisha Kent
Yes.

Keshav Kant
We talked about this again, on the episode of Off Colour Commentary that you were just a guest of. I talked about how, as a trans person, I’m medically transitioning next year, ,y team of doctors is very gender-affirming. They’re great. But when they heard I didn’t want to lose weight before, after I went on hormones, it kind of- it didn’t. It didn’t make sense to them. They’re like, You’re doing all of this to change your body. But like, you won’t lose weight? I was like, cuz I like being fat.

Clarkisha Kent
There’s no point-like, this is a good size for me. Why does that confuse you?

Keshav Kant
Legitimately, I was like, baby girl, I am 6’3″. If I was any skinnier, it would look like I was the gangliest bitch to walk this planet.

Clarkisha Kent
Or God forbid you have the bobblehead thing. Like I had that going on towards the end of high school. It was bad. It was bad. You could’ve flicked my head, it would have “duh duh duh” like it was just back and forth. I was like, I will never do this again.

Keshav Kant
It’s really not. But while we’re on the topic of like, you know, because we talked about sexuality and consumption, you do for a good amount as well talk about how religion, fatness, colorism, mental and physical disabilities, all sort of compounded into making sexuality this distant but very powerful force. Because you talk explicitly about how you were still a sexual creature. You just didn’t know how to approach your own sexuality. And then what I really loved is, and I knew that you weren’t going to do this the whole “Woe is me, I’m a fat person, I can’t fuck” because fat people fuck!

Clarkisha Kent
We be fucking and we be fucking! And people be fucking us, but they don’t want to talk about it. But we be fucking.

Keshav Kant
Truly. Listen, men are- I’m not, I can’t speak to women, because my experiences there are very limited. But like, hey, you know, Michelle Yeoh, I’m ready if you are. We be fucking and I knew you were going to discuss it openly in the book. I’m very happy that the tone of the discussions of those is so centered around your journey into like, wanting to reconnect it and taking agency because it’s I- It’s very refreshing to see someone who’s fat, someone who’s a person of colour, I’m sure for dark skinned black woman, they’re gonna have their own experiences, but like.

Clarkisha Kent
Yup.

Keshav Kant
It’s so nice when someone just owns their sexuality is like, I might not be at the same experience level of whatever the fuck is going on with everyone else. But I know what I need and I’m gonna get those needs met. So how was that experience writing for you? Because again, it’s very personal. Like I am a hoe on the internet, but I’m not letting you and you decided to let people in.

Clarkisha Kent
Yeah, the whole process, it was definitely tough. Because there were points in my journey where, like you mentioned, I felt a little bit insecure about the lack of experience. You know, I even talked about in the book where it’s like, for me, it was annoying having to navigate the whole concept of very outdated right, virgintity, right, virginity.

I’m getting to like my early 20s. But we’re heading towards my mid-20s. And then you know, my late 20s. It was very annoying because it kind of felt like an albatross around my neck. Like, I’m just carrying around this thing. It’s like a reverse scarlet A almost, but it was refreshing to playback and kind of realize like, yeah, I really, I planned all this. I was like, I want to start my sexual journey, right?

In a way that is not traumatizing. Because I listen to a lot of particularly like my cishet girlfriend stories nd it was a lot of horror stories. A lot of like, two pump chumps they were dealing with and I just, I didn’t want that. I don’t want to look back and be like, yeah, like I just, you know, he like walked past me and then I lost it. Like, you know. I don’t, I didn’t want that.

I definitely wanted it to be as you know, comfortable as possible, as fun right? Because that was supposed to be sensual, even romantic too. Like, I knew I wasn’t going get no Notebook shit out the gate probably. But like, I wanted it to be fun, I wanted to look back be like ah. So it was nice kind of having things played back for me realizing that hey, like you really did it. You set out to have a really good experience. You set out to root out a lot of the *clear’s throat* programming that you know Abrahamic religions tend to instill in people who you know, such as a woman but also people that you know, have like other people have vaginas. Right?

Like the kind of programming you get, like bombarded with in terms of like, what is or isn’t holy, right, to do to that sexual organ. So, yeah, that was my thing is very important after leaving Christianity. It was very important for me to have that good experience because a large portion of that doctrine unfortunately spends time trying to restrict what one would consider sex. What sex is, what it’s for. So yeah, after leaving that behind, I was like, this is something I have to do to make everything that I went through, like to kind of like hit that hard reset button, so to speak.

Keshav Kant
Yeah, that’s very real. And like, again, because I was texting you updates as I was reading the book, for me. Like, in Hinduism, being queer isn’t like, inherently a negative thing. Because like for us, queerness, it exists in this like, weird gray area, because everything, everything about Hinduism is fruit. But culturally, men are going to men, and patriarchy is going to patriarchy. So whereas your experiences with queerness, and sexuality were like “you can’t do that shit!”. Mine was what are these things? Like no one talked about it, or anything. So for me growing up, I was like, oh, I just am.

Clarkisha Kent
Right.

Keshav Kant
And I’ve talked about this before, where I was like, I was in like fifth-grade sex-ed class, Toronto district, school board, sex education back in the early 2000s. They were like, and you will notice you’re attracted to girls. And I was like, hold a pause. You said girls?!

Clarkisha Kent
You said what?

Keshav Kant
Explain.

Clarkisha Kent
Let’s, let’s unpack that.

Keshav Kant
Yeah. So for me, it was a completely- it was a completely opposite experience. But the way I came about engaging in it was very similar. I took ownership of my experiences very early on. I was like, if we’re going to do this, it happens on my terms.

Clarkisha Kent
Yep.

Keshav Kant
It happens the way I want it.

Clarkisha Kent
Yep.

Keshav Kant
And I will say knock on wood. Thank you, God, whoever’s listening, Gaia, Devi Ma, who was I, thankfully, took very good control, I haven’t had a negative experience. Because even if it felt like it was gonna happen. I was like, I’m leaving, you know, I’m not going to be involved. But, you know, life does have its plans, and when it comes to the love department, unfortunately, you can’t be that strategic. Which is one of the things I really loved about Fat Off, Fat On is you make it a point to discuss how the emotional aspect of those relationships impacts you even if you weren’t like super invested in the thing. Like with your physical therapist, we can’t get the specifics, but that bitch was trifling!

Clarkisha Kent
He was sexy, but he was trifling.

Keshav Kant
That’s the most sexy people, they’re just. But then we have your partner again, and all of these names are changed! So we have Bruce who showed you that your bisexuality and your experiences with sexuality are very different than a man’s, even though he was a white man, there was still a very different relationship. And you have that conversation, like, I can’t love him more than he loves himself. That’s a journey for him to take. And then Emiliano, that’s a whole other journey of when you know that, like, this could be a great relationship, but I have to walk away.

Promotional banner for Fat Off, Fat On by Clarkisha Kent via Feminist Press
Promotional banner for Fat Off, Fat On by Clarkisha Kent via Feminist Press

Clarkisha Kent
It’s too much shit going on. I know, certain people be like, you know the whole timing thing is not a thing. And I’m like, I usually actually pushed back with that because actually, the largest lesson of my life is actually timing. As you mentioned, I’ve been writing forever, right?

I knew I wanted to publish a book when I was like 13, 14, 15. I started taking the steps to do that, I shopped stuff around, and even sent a few query letters. I did all of that and there were so many no. It continued, even through college. Like everything, like just No, no, no, no, no, maybe. No, no, no, no, no. 10 years. Eventually, I hanged it up somewhat and then kind of veered into the more you know, journalistic side of things. But eventually, right, I got the Yes. You know, oh, in my agent, Claire…

Keshav Kant

We love manifestation!

Clarkisha Kent

Yes, they slipped into my DMs they were like, so word on the street is you’re looking to write a book? And I was like, how you know that? I haven’t really talked about that in a while, you know?

Keshav Kant
Listen, I love Claire! Finger on the pulse, they know everything!

Clarkisha Kent
Claire Draper, everyone! That’s my agent, I love them. But yeah, they just kind of knew somehow that you know, they follow their intuition. They knew I wanted to go into your writing books and now here we are. But you know, the timing for that. I wasn’t ready for that when I was 14, 15, 16, it was the wrong time. Even though that’s what I was supposed to be doing. So I wanted to make that clear in the book, that this could in fact actually be the right person. But look, at what’s going in both of our lives, chaos. So yeah, you’re right. I did have to be like, we probably should walk away right now I don’t want to but yeah.

Keshav Kant
Yeah, that goodbye moment between y’all it was very rough and reminiscent of my relationship because that’s how it ended. Because I was like, you know what we got to, we got to cut this but also hey

Clarkisha Kent
Hey just you know, one for the road,

Keshav Kant
Just one for the road, you know, for the bank.

But I was like it hurt, I will say what makes it a little worse is the book of breath ends very abruptly, you call it your unofficial end for a reason. I’m not gonna lie, I was reading it on my phone, I was crying onto my screen just trying to scroll and find some more chapters in there. But that was it. And as someone who works like on- I’m not gonna even call myself a published author, it’s an essay in an anthology. But like I

Clarkisha Kent

Oh no, we manifesting just, oh, no, no, no qualifiers, none of that!

Keshav Kant
Okay, as an author, and also as who works in publishing outside of running Off Colour, I understand why you did it. As a critic, I understand why you did it. It is a brilliant way to end a book because it leaves the reader wanting more.

But as a friend and someone who was in a goddamn hurt, it hurt. But now you got to market ready for book 2, 3, and 4. But I want to know, what was that like for you, you know, putting your life on page, and then having to walk away and just be like, “That’s it, that’s all I can give you.”?

Clarkisha Kent
Um, it was there surreal, because like, it does end abruptly, but I was tempted to put, you know, the little fancy writing like the, you know, and then that like that was it.

You know, when to make it clear that, you know, my story is still in progress in the works. You know, I’m 28 today. It’s my birthday today. So a Taurus, right, you know, the story is still being written as we speak. So much stuff even happened past the point of where I stopped in the book. You know, when I fire look, you know, I was still in California, I just moved, obviously to Maryland. But that’s like, since then just what, two, three years and so much has happened. So I didn’t want to stop it.

But like you said, like, a crucial point in that you’re like, hey, if fate will have me, I’ll probably return to like, maybe pick up the story again, but I think it is important to know when to end things. I think my very strong criticism I have for like modern media, whether it’s TV, film, even books are that they don’t know when to end. Like, we’ll have extra seasons movies that were just kind of not necessary. Because, you know,

Keshav Kant
Everyone got a spin-off.

Clarkisha Kent
Yeah, people do find comfort with these characters, I understand. But at some point, their story need to end. Or at least they go on to do other things. And I think is, I don’t know if it’s nostalgia, I don’t know if it’s like the comfort I mentioned.

But yeah, you know, Western artisans particularly have an interesting relationship with closure. I’ve always made it a point in my writing to tell people that it’s not a thing. And even if it is a thing, it’s something you have to give yourself, right. So I kind of wanted to kind of reinforce my beliefs on that with the ending in that like, hey, you know, time marches on. I do have to park to here because if I don’t park here, we’re going to keep going on and on and on. And then it might get less interesting from there, depending on who you are. So yeah, the abrupt ending was definitely on purpose. If I were to write the book again, I will still do it.

Keshav Kant
That’s fair, I’ve consulted on manuscripts for people and usually, people meander when it comes to the end of the story, and I was like, no, you need an end. So, do we but before we do, our final question. I always ask what do you want people to know? When they hit preorder, as they go into getting their own copies of Fat Off, Fat On what would you like them to expect?

Clarkisha Kent
Expect to laugh, do a little crying, like I said, very, very triggering material. You’re gonna have your own biases challenged too. Even if you are a part of these oppressed classes that I’m talking about, you know, when all of those converge, I don’t even like to use the word intersectional anymore, because they don’t run them to the ground. But like I said, even if you are a part of an oppressed class like you’re gonna have to analyze your own biases. For example, there’s a sizable portion of my book where I talked about having an adversarial relationship with white gays, when I was trying to, you know, kind of figure out where I was falling on the, you know, queer spectrum. So things like that, I want people to be prepared.

It’s probably not gonna be as warm and fuzzy to you when you have that bias challenged, but you know, keep reading, and see where you go with that. I don’t want it to be like a finger-wagging exercise, because I too, in real-time was unlearning biases that I’ve been taught or fed. But you know, it’s important to realize that we are, you know, human beings are constantly evolving. So, as long as you are evolving, and learning, there’s still hope for you.

Keshav Kant
That’s a beautiful note to end on. At the end of the day, that’s the question sort of everyone has to ask themselves. How much are we capable of change and how much of that change comes down to? Do we want to change? Do we want to grow?

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us today Clarkisha it was a pleasure, and we’ll see you back for our Twitter Spaces chat happening Sat May 21st!

Clarkisha Kent
Thank you so much for having me, and I’ll see you there!

And thank you for reading our interview with Clarkisha! If you haven’t already, make sure you preorder your copy of Fat Off, Fat On: A Big Bitch Manifesto here, and set a reminder for Saturday, May 21st at 7-8 pm EST to join us for our Twitter Spaces chat!

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Keshav Kant, aka Mx. KantEven, is a neuroscience nerd turned Creative Consultant and Executive Director of Off Colour!

You’ve probably seen her on TikTok or caught her work on Off Colour's many channels. From consulting on films & shows, manuscript review, conducting interviews, or hosting podcasts & panels, if there is some way to bring sensitivity and authenticity to diversity, inclusion and equity conversations, Keshav will be there.

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